first_imgThe Rhode Island Division of Taxation has issued an advisory containing highlights of the upcoming tax amnesty program. The division notes that it will:begin accepting applications on Friday, December 1, 2017; andwill mail account statements beginning in early November notifying taxpayers of their account balances.In addition, the division is developing an application, a website, and a phone bank to answer calls about the program.Advisory 2017-29, Rhode Island Division of Taxation, September 27, 2017, ¶200-916Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

first_imgAn Indiana recreational vehicle (RV) retailer was liable for Indiana sales tax where it delivered RVs to out-of-state customers at a gas station in Michigan. The company only delivered in Michigan when:customers were residents of a state that didn’t have a tax exemption reciprocity agreement with Indiana; andthe RV purchase was not exempt from Indiana sales tax.The Indiana Supreme Court held that structuring RV sales for out-of-state residents so that RVs are delivered to customers in Michigan had no legitimate business purpose.Choice of State for Receiving DeliveryWhen selling RVS to out-of-state residents, the company offered customers from states without reciprocity agreements the choice to pay Indiana sales tax or the sales tax of their home state. When customers chose their home state’s tax, the company drove the RVs to a gas station three miles over the border into Michigan. Michigan and Indiana do not have a reciprocity agreement. The customers followed the RV from the company location to the Michigan gas station. Once there, the customers signed delivery confirmations and received the keys for the RVs. The company did not collect Indiana sales tax on these sales.Substance, Not Form, Controls in Tax TransactionsThe company argued that its business purposes for these Michigan deliveries were:making sure customers paid tax to the proper taxing authority;avoiding double taxation; andkeeping its pricing competitive.The high Court found that each of these purposes was tax-based, not business-based. Indiana follows the destination principle that tax is owed in the jurisdiction where a product or good is delivered. In this case, the company artificially shifted the delivery destination to avoid Indiana sales tax. Further, the company cannot help customers avoid paying a double tax by failing to collect Indiana sales tax as required by law. Third, Indiana business cannot ignore Indiana sales tax to entice customers.The Court concluded the Michigan deliveries were a sham since the company had no business purpose for delivering RVs to Michigan for select customers.Richardson’s R.V. v. Indiana Dept. of Revenue, Indiana Supreme Court, No. 18S-TA-22, December 5, 2018, ¶403-023Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

first_imgRakia’s Style Nation:Trends in Tresses – Naturalistas Listen up ladies! In Philadelphia, we keep it fly from hair to toe. Take a walk on the wild side with us as we give you our guide to all salons who can bring the naturalista out in you.  Here you’ll see some of my favorite places to go when you want to rock twists, a fro, locks or anything that doesn’t require a hot appliance to style. Rakia’s Style Nation: Trends in Tresses – Naturalistas(Photo by D. King for GPTMC)center_img In our next Trends in Tresses video —all about how to be a straightenista —we’ll show you exactly how we straighten things out with the haute stylists and their blown out styles of choice. And for the ladies who like to extend their manes, my extensionistas video will give you the tips behind half weaves, why you shouldn’t be using glue on those tracks, and the latest tips and tricks for when you are looking to extend it.last_img read more

first_imgThere’s more bridge work on Highway 63 causing delays.Crews on Sunday night started repairs on northbound 63 over I-70 in Columbia. Expect one-lane traffic there until Friday, Nov. 1.MoDot says bridge rehab will continue into December on Highway 63 at Turkey Creek just north of Ashland, and on southbound 63 at Gans Creek just south of Columbia.last_img

first_imgThis was a great session with a very engaged audience. Download the session and check it out – then come back and download the tools. If you use them in your environment, please tell us – how did you use them? Did you modify them? We’d love to hear all about it. I was at the Intel Developer Forum earlier this week and dropped in to check out a session that Brian Cockell and Chris Piper, a couple of my co-workers, were putting on. If you’re looking for a way to automate some Intel vPro features – or a way to easily implement them for the first time, then you need to download this session – the slides are posted on the Intel Developer Forum site. The solutions that they discussed can be used as-is – or you can use them as a starting point for developing your own solution.The guys talked about the Use Case Reference Designs that are available here, on the Intel vPro Expert Center, as well as the extensive work that has gone into the Intel vPro Powershell module. These solutions were created to make it easier and faster for all of our end-users – developers and IT admins – to implement usages with Intel vPro technology.Chris manages the Intel vPro PowerShell Module and showed us a quick demo. What I really got a kick out of was – he wrote a PowerShell script to automate the demo of the vPro Powershell scripts. Ha! This demo script is attached to this blog, below. Open it up and take a look! He reminded us that everything in this module is open – you can modify it, distribute it – so what are you waiting for? Next, Brian gave an overview of the Use Case Reference Designs. Each reference design provides everything that you need to create a solution or service for vPro. If you’re not familar with them, go check them out at the landing page. Brian walked through a demo of mounting a remote drive using the Remote ISO Launcher. The Remote ISO Launcher is a graphical interface for easily rebooting remotely managed Intel vPro technology-based systems to remote ISO images. You can get the tool here: last_img read more

first_imgThese new form factors, combined with unprecedented data availability, are changing the way that people can work in the enterprise. Business-class tablets powered by the Intel family of processors come with built-in security6 features and manageability capabilities, with performance that ranges from Intel Atom processors to Intel Core vPro processor technology.There are more options for longer battery life, including the ability to replace the batteries as needed. And with the latest tablets, employees can choose how to interact—whether it’s using
touch, writing with a stylus, typing on-screen, or using a detachable keyboard.Discover how mobile devices based on 4th generation Intel® CoreTM vProTM processorsOpens in a new window are designed to meet the security and manageability requirements of your business, with the performance, style, and form factors that your users demand. Read the full whitepaper here.Click here for a case study of how real-world organizations are integrating tablets into their daily operations.For more conversations about IT Center and enterprise mobility, click on the hashtags below:#itcenterOpens in a new window #mobility Regardless of the specific types of mobile devices you choose
 for your employees, there is a significant opportunity to increase productivity across your business. Today’s employees want greater flexibility to work where and when they can. When you can give them the right mobile tool for the job, you can help them work more efficiently.In Intel’s case, employees report saving an average of 57 minutes a day using mobile devices—that’s nearly an hour of productivity gained each day by simply providing a different way to work. Think of the productivity benefits you could gain by scaling this flexibility across your entire organization, ultimately reducing the cost of 
doing business.Yet flexibility means different things to different people. Employees will have varying needs depending on their role, whether they’re working at multiple client sites, from different buildings at your worksite, or from home either during the work week or after hours. Some employees may even work within a changing physical environment that may include one or more of the following:Indoor and outdoor locations Facility or construction sites Restricted factory locations Traditional office environments Standing-room-only environments 
There are a range of business-class form factors that are designed to meet the various needs of mobile users in today’s enterprise environment. 2 in 1: A New Kind of Device for 
Enterprise Mobility Many users today are relying on more than one device for work, often for travel convenience. Not only is this cumbersome, but it also means that IT has more to worry about—including the budget constraints of supporting multiple devices per user. By working closely with employees, you can help find the device that best meets their needs, whether it’s a notebook, a tablet, or a new 2 in 1 device. The UltrabookTM 2 in 1 device offers an ideal solution for the best of both worlds: It’s a tablet when you want it to be and a laptop when you need it to be. When employees are traveling or meeting with clients, they can flip the touch screen and use it as a tablet. When they’re ready to write a report or respond to an e-mail, they can easily convert it into a laptop with a fully functioning keyboard. There are also detachable models with the option to disconnect the touch screen from the keyboard, making it a lightweight, portable tablet. This can be a great solution for users who might need to be available via e-mail and instant messaging or to consume content, yet don’t need full PC functionality.At less than an inch thick, the business-class Ultrabook device comes in a variety of screen sizes and lightweight designs for discerning mobile users. A hardened chassis and strong hinges ensure that it can withstand the rigors of constant travel. Employees can get to work quickly with devices that wake in a flash and deliver a longer battery life. The sleek, durable 2 in 1 device delivers the performance to satisfy the high expectations of power users while eliminating the need to carry multiple devices. It’s also a cost-efficient option for IT because it can allow for a single device to serve the function of two, thereby minimizing the number of devices you must support and maintain.Business-Class Tablets: A Different Way to WorkNot all employees fit a single definition of what it means to be “mobile.” Some employees may need a portable device to use within a specific building or worksite—whether it’s in an office building or a clinical setting, on the warehouse floor, or in a retail store. They may or may not have a constant, designated workspace, or may not have ever had their own PC, which means the productivity benefits of tablets can be significant.The Intel processor-based family of business-class tablets is now available in an increasing range of sizes, from those compact enough to take anywhere to those with screens large enough
to handle on-the-fly collaboration with colleagues. Powerful performance capabilities and compatible technology let users work quickly, including the ability to:Multitask with ease, with multiple screens open simultaneously.Interact with clients in a secure videoconference while sharing images and working on a document—all at the same time, on a single tablet screen. Stay productive with the ability to view Flash pages, print wirelessly, and navigate quickly, with support for browser plug-ins. Use convenient USB ports to share data and connect to peripheral devices, such as keyboards and cameras. Share information across devices without risking content deterioration, such as altered characters and distorted graphics, which can delay workflows or even pose a significant risk to the business. last_img read more

first_imgWe’ve worked with SAP HANA* for more than a decade to deliver better performance for SAP* applications running on Intel® architecture. And the results just keep getting better. The latest Intel® Xeon® processor E7 v2 family can help IT get even more insights from SAP HANA, faster. When you add VMWare VSphere* to the mix, you’ll see a huge boost in efficiency without adding more servers.Why virtualize? Data centers running mission-critical apps are pushing toward more virtualization because it can help reduce costs and labor, simplify management, and save energy and space. In response to this push, Intel, SAP, and VMware have collaborated to make a robust solution for data center virtualization with SAP HANA.What does this mean for IT managers? Your data center can grow with more scalable memory. You can have the peace of mind your data is protected with greater reliability. And, you’ll see big gains in efficiency, even when virtualized.Grow with scalable memoryThe Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family offers 3x more memory capacity than previous generations, This not only dramatically increases the speed of SAP HANA performance, but it also gives you plenty of room as your data grows. Our Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family also provides up to 6 terabytes of memory in four-socket servers and 64 GB dual in-line memory modules.[Relax, your mission-critical data is protectedWe designed the Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family to support improved reliability, accessibility, and serviceability (RAS) features, which means solid performance all day, every day with 99.999% uptime[4]. Intel® Run Sure Technology adds even more system uptime and increases data integrity for business-critical workloads. Whether you run SAP HANA on physical machines, virtualized, or on a private cloud, your data and mission-critical apps are in good hands.Be amazed at the gains in efficiencyWhen Intel, SAP HANA, and VMWare join forces in a virtualized environment, efficiencies abound. Data processing can be twice as fast with a PCI Express* (PCle) solid-state drive, You can get up to 4x more I/O bandwidth, which equates to 4x more capacity for data circulation.5,6 Hyper-threading doubles the number of execution threads, increasing overall performance for complex workloads..In summary, the Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family unleashes the full range of SAP HANA capabilities with the simplicity and flexibility of virtualization on vSphere. Read more about this solution in our recent white paper, “Go Big or Go Home with Raw Processing Power for Virtualized SAP HANA.”Follow #TechTim on Twitter and his growing #analytics @TimIntel community.last_img read more

first_imgISC High Performance, also known as the International Supercomputing Conference, is always a great showcase for groundbreaking innovations in HPC. And that’s the way things are shaping up for this year’s conference, set for June 19 – 23 in Frankfurt. ISC will provide a stage for unveiling important advances in HPC systems, including many using Intel Scalable System FrameworkAmong other highlights, at ISC Intel will feature demos that provide an inside look at notable projects that are capitalizing on Intel architectures and the innovations found in Intel-based HPC clusters.A few key examples we intend to show:Together with one of our European partners, ÉCOLE POLYTECHNIQUE FÉDÉRALE DE LAUSANNE (EPFL) we will demonstrate a brain neuron growth 3D visualization.Kyoto University explores how deep learning accelerates the drug discovery process. The demo features code ported from a GPU architecture to the Intel® Xeon Phi™ processor to demonstrate extraordinary performance.Cambridge’s Stephen Hawking CTC team will treat viewers to a black hole collision simulation 3D visualization generating Einstein’s predicted and recently observed (LIGO) gravitational waves.Germany-based Computer Simulation Technology (CST) will show it’s applications for electromagnetic analysis for radio frequency, microwave and other EM fields.Demos like these underscore the importance of HPC systems in fueling insights into the world around us—and more distant phenomenon, like black holes. They also show what is possible when you put HPC systems within the reach of more people.Today, this is happening all around the world, but specifically, advances in hardware and software are making European based HPC clusters accessible to an ever-wider range of commercial, academic, and governmental users. We are truly in the era of the democratization of simulation via enabling wider and easier access to the HPC systems that run on them.Together with our technology partners, Intel is an active player in the effort to throw open the doors to the world of high performance computing. With that goal in mind, Intel is a platinum-level sponsor of ISC, as well as a close collaborator with the European and global HPC community. Intel is collaborating with more than 20 Intel Parallel Computing Centers in Europe, focusing on code modernization to maximize the returns on hardware and software investments and accelerating the pace of innovation and discovery with HPC systems.Other ongoing Intel efforts include collaboration with the HPC community through the Linux Foundation’s OpenHPC* Community to provide a modular, integrated HPC system software stack to simplify the complexity of installation, configuration, and ongoing maintenance of HPC system software.  This effort enables greater innovation, faster system installations and more consistent open source HPC solutions based on the community collaboration of over thirty-nine participating organizations, including academic and government end users, ISVs, and OEMs.The key takeaway here is pretty simple: In both the business and academic worlds, HPC and big data analytics fuels insight, and Intel is working to deliver the next-generation frameworks and systems that provide a firm foundation for the great things that are happening in this space.I will close with a schedule of Intel-related activities that that will take place at ISC. If you’re heading to conference, I hope to see you at some of these events. Be sure to join Intel’s vice president of the Data Center Group, Rajeeb Hazra for his special keynote at 18:00 on Monday June 20th. Also stop into the Expert Zone in the Intel booth, where our HPC specialists will be on deck to field your questions By Stephan Gillich, Director of Technical Computing GTM for Intel EMEA. See the full of activities in the Intel Collab Hub at ISC 2016.last_img read more

first_imgFor me, as for most busy professionals, looking polished matters. But who has time to shop for clothes? Sometimes, I long for the days of the old-fashioned men’s furnishings salesman with his “little black book.” Using notes on his regulars’ sizes and style preferences and his extensive product expertise, he kept his customers well dressed and happy—with minimal effort on their part. Sadly, finding these sales professionals has become more difficult in recent years. My wife points out that I could try the modern-day equivalent—Trunk Club* or a similar online store. But with the added complication (and delay) of shipping, that option just isn’t very appealing—I like the immediacy of shopping locally. Happily, there is hope for shoppers who feel as I do. Technology innovations are now being put to use in-store to enhance the capabilities of sales associates and improve and personalize the shopping experience.Nearly 82% of current shoppers say that—like me—they prefer to complete their purchases in a brick-and-mortar store.1 This gives brands a significant opportunity to earn loyalty and increase basket. But there’s a complication: fully 70% now research their planned purchases online first.2 The transparency and wide availability of the Internet mean that modern consumers arrive in the store better informed about products than ever before. And when they are in store, they want quick, knowledgeable service. Instead, they frequently find that store staffers lack access even to the same information that they themselves have found online. Without the right tools, sales associates are ill-equipped to offer meaningful advice or assistance. This disappoints shoppers and gives them a reason to go elsewhere. Finding a way to bridge this gap between online and in-store is vital to continued retail success.Restoring sales associates to their pivotal role can be a key step in solving the problem, and a powerful, new solution from NCR is designed to do exactly that. NCR Sales Advisor* for Windows* on Intel® devices is the first-of-its-kind, modern, little black book—a tool for effective shoulder-to-shoulder selling that enhances the associate/shopper relationship by providing access to each shopper’s history and preferences, synched from all points of sale: online, mobile and in-store. While online channels have tracked customers’ previously purchased items and preferences for some time, store floor associates have lacked this information. Giving them access to shopper history can boost their effectiveness and make brick-and-mortar stores more compelling for shoppers.Detailed shopper profiles, combined with personalized recommendations and promotions, allow associates to show shoppers that the brand knows who they are and what they like. Real-time access to both customer and inventory information gives them the ability to help customers find what they need quickly and complete transactions on the spot. And powerful guided selling tools and virtual product views equip them to up-sell, cross-sell and increase the number of items in a customer’s basket.Here’s one example of how NCR Sales Advisor can transform sales associates from clerks into valued consultants:Now, when a customer tries on clothing in the store, the associate who hangs the clothes in the fitting room notes sizes, colors and styles and then scurries off to find items that might go with. The results are hit or miss, at best. With the use of recommendation engines within the Sales Advisor app, the associate (and the process) could be much more effective—and efficient—leading to significant basket uplift and increased customer satisfaction.Using the power of eCommerce, flexible, comprehensive NCR Sales Advisor helps brands know their customers better. It equips sales associates to add value to the shopping experience while driving revenue for the business.1 Christopher Donnelly and Renato Scaff, “Who are the Millennial shoppers? And what do they really want?,” Outlook: Accenture’s Journal of High-Performance Business, 2013, https://www.accenture.com/us-en/insight-outlook-who-are-millennial-shoppers-what-do-they-really-want-retailOpens in a new window2 Intel-Merkle Digital Shopper Behavior, 2014.last_img read more

first_imgThe challenge of a Unified Commerce experience is linking up everything from the cloud to the store. Intel recognizes that there are all sorts of ways for information to fall through the cracks, which leads to decreased sales and revenue. Better retail experiences with edge computing have Intel technology behind the wheel. Read on to see how different aspects of the retail experience are improved with Intel.Mobile Sales Tools Personalize the ExperienceThe days of being unsure about a product before entering a store are over. Now, customers enter a retail location with a bevy of online reviews, video unboxings, and opinions about any given product. This can often leave store associates at a disadvantage, because customers sometimes know more about the products in the store than they do.Mobile devices loaded with sales-assist appsOpens in a new window empower retail employees to access information about customers’ loyalty to a given brand and purchases they’ve made. Insights like these can lead to customers feeling that they’re understood by associates and getting the best product for them.Inventory Accuracy Cuts ShrinkageThink inventory distortion is a minor issue? Think again — shrinkage, overstock, and stock-outs are a nearly $1.1 trillion problem for retailers around the globe. In the U.S., shrinkage alone costs retailers $42 billion.Take a deep breath and let those numbers sink in.What if you could keep inventory under tight control, whether online or on the edge? That’s possible with the Intel Retail Sensor PlatformOpens in a new window. Using RFID tags in conjunction with other technology, retailers can track inventory as it moves around the store while preserving customer privacy. Sensor technology helps sales associates know when items are running low and give online shoppers an idea of whether or not an item is in store. The edge feels more like reality with Intel technology backing it.Raising Brand Recognition With Smart MarketingUsing sales-assist tools and the Retail Sensor Platform, retailers get first-hand knowledge about customer buying patterns that are attributed to each edge location. Using this information allows for better marketing during seasonal customer purchasing.Retailers can also draw from social media data for better campaigns that meet customers where they are in the purchasing process. With an enterprise-level analytics platformOpens in a new window, gathering data from the cloud and turning it into actionable data is easy.Interested in finding out more about what Intel solutions can do for brick-and-mortar? Check out our retail solutions page for moreOpens in a new window. Or, head over to the IT Peer NetworkOpens in a new window for the latest in IT news from retail and beyond.last_img read more

first_imgDespite the dreams of science fiction fans everywhere, no antimatter galaxies lurk in the far corners of the universe. So concludes a trio of theorists who calculated the energy that would be emitted when huge domains of matter and antimatter meet and annihilate, then compared the result to the gamma-ray glow that pervades the sky. Their finding, to be reported in the Astrophysical Journal in February, may sound like a victory for conventional wisdom, but it underscores a long-standing mystery: why the big bang displayed such blatant favoritism toward matter.The universe that sprang from the big bang should have contained equal parts of matter and antimatter. But cosmologists have long known that our cosmic neighborhood is all matter. The favored explanation is that soon after the big bang, a slight asymmetry somehow developed between matter and antimatter, which enabled matter to win out. Another possibility, however, is that the universe started off with equal amounts of matter and antimatter, in separate clumps. When the newborn universe went through a spurt of exponential growth, called inflation, these clumps grew so quickly that they never had time to annihilate completely. If so, the universe today would have huge, separate domains of matter and antimatter.If these domains are big enough, astronomers could easily have overlooked the gamma rays from matter-antimatter annihilation at their boundaries, says Boston University physicist Andy Cohen. The annihilation would have begun in the early universe, so that the gamma rays would be smeared out and red-shifted to lower energies. Conceivably, this annihilation signal could explain the observed gamma ray background.So Cohen, Alvaro de Rújula of CERN, and Sheldon Glashow of Harvard University tested the idea by computing the spectrum of diffuse photons from matter-antimatter annihilation in the early universe. The three physicists conclude that even in the most conservative analysis, matter-antimatter annihilation should produce a signal five times as large as the observable diffuse gamma ray background. “It’s an awfully big effect,” says Glashow.The University of Chicago’s David Schramm says the analysis definitely reinforces the “prior prejudices” of theorists that the antimatter isn’t there. It also lengthens the odds for a planned search for antimatter cosmic rays, such as nuclei of anticarbon, coming from distant antigalaxies (Science, 12 January 1996, p. 142). The experiment, led by physicist Sam Ting of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and CERN, is scheduled to be tested on the space shuttle this May. “We’re not exactly saying it’s impossible for [Ting] to find antimatter,” says Glashow. But “if he finds it, he upsets the whole apple cart.”last_img read more

first_imgA long-shot attempt to block U.K. researchers from creating human-animal hybrid cells or embryos has ended quickly, with a judge dismissing a new lawsuit filed by the Christian Legal Centre and the Comment on Reproductive Ethics and ruling that the groups should pay £20,000 in court costs. The two parties had challenged the decision by the U.K’s. Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) to grant licenses for the interspecies work to several research teams. (A new law expanding the types of research regulated by HFEA was recently adopted.) In a statement, Stephen Minger of King’s College London, who has one of the licenses, hailed the court decision: It is gratifying that Justice Mrs. Dobbs recognized that the science behind the creation of hybrid embryos was always about creating unique cloned human cell lines that could accelerate the development of therapies for a number of important neurodegenerative conditions.  We welcome her decision and would also like to thank our legal team who worked so hard to defend our science.last_img read more

first_imgThe California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) yesterday issued four citations against the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), in the 29 December fire that led to the death of a 23-year-old research assistant. Sheharbano Sangji, a 2008 graduate of Pomona College, was badly burned while working in the laboratory of Patrick Harran, professor and chair of the department, and died 18 days later.The UCLA department was cited for Sangji’s failure to wear protective clothing, for not training employees “on the hazards of occupational exposure to chemicals in a laboratory,” and for “unsafe work practices identified during inspection and not corrected in a timely manner.” The department was also fined $31,875.A university spokesperson said that UCLA “will not contest the findings or appeal the fine.” In a statement issued this morning, Chancellor Gene Block said: “I communicated to the UCLA community plans for a comprehensive review of our laboratory inspection programs and implementation of revised procedures to ensure the safety of our researchers. … The Cal/OSHA report will provide critical assistance with these ongoing efforts.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Neal Langerman, an officer of the American Chemical Society’s Division of Chemical Health and Safety, said that it is unusual for state regulatory agencies to cite and fine university departments for safety violations. “This one is way up there on the seriousness scale,” he added.Sangji, who had worked in the lab for 2 months, was injured while attempting to draw a quantity of the chemical t-butyl lithium from a receptacle using a syringe. The material, which is pyrophoric, burst into flame on contact with air when “the plunger was either ejected or pulled out of the syringe,” according to report’s narrative summary of the incident. The “liquid … spilled onto [Sangji’s] clothing, torso and hands …and immediately caught fire. … No appropriate clothing protection nor a laboratory coat was used while working with the pyrophoric material,” the report found. In addition, Sangji wore a “sweatshirt made of synthetic material.”The 15-page report cites a deficiency in the department’s records of safety and health training on exposure to hazardous chemicals. It notes that a safety inspection of the Harran lab by UCLA on 30 October had “identified [the failure of employees to wear required protective clothing] and recommended that laboratory coats must be worn while conducting research and handling hazardous materials in the laboratory.” But it says that the lab “did not implement procedures for correcting unsafe and unhealthy conditions, work practices and work procedures in a timely manner based on the severity of the hazard.”last_img read more

first_imgThe Mars rover that has been stuck in talcum-powder-like soil the past 6 months is in a bad way, its NASA team reported in a press conference today. After months of analysis and testing here on Earth, “we haven’t found a clear solution to how to get Spirit out of its predicament,” said project manager John Callas of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Monday, the team will start spirit on its best bet—”the path of least resistance”—by trying to send it out the way it came in.No one in the press conference was very upbeat about extricating Spirit following its “embedding” of last April. “Spirit may have met its match,” said Douglas McCuistion, director of the Mars Exploration Program at NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C. “This could be where Spirit remains.” The press release had McCuistion being just plain discouraged. “There’s a high probablility attempts to free Spirit will not be successful,” was the quote.All the glumness seems justified. Spirit had for years been dragging an inoperable wheel through the Martian soil. Now that the rover is stuck, another of its six wheels is acting up and may be jammed. The other four wheels are nearly buried in the dry, fluffy soil. And a look under the rover using its arm-mounted microscopic imager has revealed that a pyrimidal rock is just touching the underbelly of the rover. If the rover sinks further as it tries to churn its way out—as it almost surely will—the rover could hang up on the rock, taking its weight off the driving wheels. If that happens, it’s “gameover,” says Callas.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Attempting to back Spirit out has at least one advantage. That could save the rover the trouble of breaking its way through the brittle crust that it fell through on the way in, operators reason. But the exercise may just be going through the motions, says a Spirit team member who wishes to remain anonymous. “You can’t let it die without making a valliant effort,” the team member says. “This will be it.” Even if it is, it’s worth noting that Spirit far exceeded the 90-day span of its promised mission. What’s more, Spirit’s counterpart, Opportunity, is still trudging along on the other side of the planet.last_img read more

first_imgPhil Jones and the University of East Anglia mostly emerged unscathed in fairly aggressive testimony before a House of Commons committee on the ClimateGate issue today. (See live-twitter coverage by ScienceInsider.) Other witnesses included outside critics of the embattled scientist and a former British Information Commissioner, who declared that the university’s actions would have warranted investigation if the 6-month limit for prosecutions hadn’t passed. The U.K.’s top science adviser and two top British climate scientists also testified on the underlying climate science, declaring there was nothing in the exposed e-mails at the heart of the controversy that would undermine bedrock climate science. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, who’s kicking off the ARPA-E conference tomorrow, is testifying the following day before the House of Representatives science committee on the Department of Energy budget. Meanwhile, the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee meets this week. On Wednesday NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco will testify on her agency’s budget. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Reforming so-called STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education for children is the subject of a House Hearing Thursday. R.I.P. Robert McCall, the “Picasso of space exploration.” Expect to see patent reform moving again soon in Senate. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, says that he and the other main players have worked out a bipartisan agreement to move forward on a compromise reform bill, to be introduced shortly as a “manager’s amendment” to patent reform bill S515. Today the effort won praise from one industry lobby group, the Coalition for 21st Century Patent Reform.last_img read more

first_imgA 5-hour public conference today in Washington, D.C., on geoengineering research highlighted a growing focus in the nation’s capital on the controversial idea of devising technical remedies for the effects of carbon pollution. Most discussions are for now behind closed doors, but some well-funded events like today’s—dubbed “Geoengineering: The Horrifying Idea Whose Time has Come?”–are putting the topic on center stage. Equally relevant for policymakers, a number of reports are coming out in the next 3 months that could lay the groundwork for a possible government program on the technology. Next month, the first of two reports by the Government Accountability Office is expected to be released laying out what research capabilities different U.S. agencies might bring to the problem and how an interagency program may be structured. Simultaneously, the House of Representatives science committee is releasing a report, prepared in conjunction with a U.K. House of Commons committee, on relevant policy issues. Additionally, in December or January, a committee of academics and government scientists, sponsored by the Bipartisan Policy Center, will release a report that should offer scientists’ take on the research policy and governance issues. Run by physicist Jane Long of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, it will cover scientific and geopolitical implications of a climate-modification research program. Guiding each of these efforts are a set of principles of safe and ethical field studies created by the Asilomar conference on geoengineering last spring, expected to be released soon. Small national programs are just getting under way in the United Kingdom, which has spent ₤1.7 million on modeling and social science studies on sun-blocking technologies, and within the European Union, which has funded a group based in Heidelberg, Germany, to study the physics, ethics, and geopolitical aspects. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Will the U.S. government set up a devoted program to coordinate and fund geoengineering studies? In a piece for Slate last week, I laid out two new obstacles to such an effort: Prominent Republicans are increasingly expressing skepticism over basic climate science, and Democrats remain focused on passing emissions cuts (for which geoengineering could be viewed as a distraction). In response to a question from the audience this morning, science committee chair Representative Bart Gordon (D-TN) said that it may be difficult to create a dedicated federal program for geoengineering, given the sensitivities. (He said cutting emissions was the first priority.) But he said existing programs may be able to devote resources to the topic and said a “coordinating committee” along the lines of the National Nanotechnology Initiative could be useful. He then floated the possibility of an authorizing bill to create a geoengineering research program in late 2012. (Gordon has been the most outspoken supporter of geoengineering research in Congress, and it’s unclear who will replace him after he retires this year.) Thomas Schelling, a member of the Long committee, said in remarks today that simply funding some studies here or there in the government was insufficient. There must be a single “locus of authority” on the topic within the government, he said. The State Department, Department of Energy, and the White House science office could each serve that role, with input from agencies doing relevant work. So, too, could the National Academy or a new independent organization. “Then the question is, who do we consult with? Individual nations? The U.N.? … Do we seek permission? Who’s permission?” “I think field experiments are very important to happen soon,” said Schelling, who won the Nobel Prize in economics in 2005. “If [sunblocking geoengineering] doesn’t work, it’s very important to know soon,” he added. That’s because policymakers must know if they could rely on emergency planet-cooling methods if they were to be needed. But what would the stated goal of such a program be, asked physicist David Keith of the University of Calgary in Canada. Setting up a research program needs goals, he said. “We can’t go back to where we were [in terms of carbon levels] for hundreds of years. Since we can’t go back, where do we want to go?” Given the thorniness of such issues, and the potential of public backlash, many scientists are concerned about pushing too hard to set up needed research, said Long. “The tension between urgency and caution has played out in our committee at every turn,” she added. The Slate story linked to in this article was written by Eli Kintisch as part of a package of stories Slate published in conjunction with the public conference that this article covers. Slate was one of the sponsors of the event, hosted by New America Foundation.last_img read more

first_img The notion that some biomedical researchers are piling up research grants simply isn’t true, says the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) extramural chief. But a relative handful of so-called fat cats still exist. In a post yesterday on her blog Rock Talk, NIH’s Sally Rockey takes on the “myth” that some investigators have large numbers of grants. A decade ago, in the midst of a 5-year NIH doubling, administrators took a close look at “fat cats,” or researchers who had six or more grants, and concluded there was no problem with overextended researchers or duplicated work. Rockey’s data show that the number of grants per investigator rose steadily during the doubling, peaked around 1.3 to 1.5 grants in 2004-2006 (depending on the type of institution), and has since drifted downward. That’s not to say that fat cats don’t exist, however. In a second graph for the top 20% funded principal investigators (presumably about 6000 people), Rockey reports that while the average principal investigator (PI) had 2.2 grants in 2009, roughly 10% (600) had four grants; 3% (180) had five; 1% (60) had six; and a few had seven or more. (For some specific numbers, see Fig. 28 on p. 66 in this 2008 report on NIH peer review, which appears to have data from 2006. At that point 573 people had four grants; 156 had five grants; 39 had six grants; 12 had seven grants; and four had eight or more grants.) Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) The same 2008 report recommended that NIH require that PIs spend at least 20% of their time on each grant (which would limit their total grants to five) unless researchers could justify an exception. NIH last_img read more

first_imgFacing a persistent budget gap, the California legislature yesterday passed an austere budget that will bring yet more financial pain to the already cash-strapped state university system. The University of California (UC) and California State University were already bracing for a total of $500 million apiece in cuts, but the new budget passed last night cuts an additional $150 million from each, which will likely force more tuition hikes. The UC system has seen state funding drop from $15,020 per student in 2000-2001 to $8220 in 2010-2011, forcing substantial tuition hikes. Some administrators fear the impact of these cuts will also be felt in the university’s ability to recruit and retain top researchers. An article in today’s Los Angeles Times reports on three senior UC scientists who’ve been lured away: Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) UC San Diego faced a losing battle recently when it tried to hang on to three star scientists being wooed by Rice University for cutting-edge cancer research. The recruiting package from the private Houston university included 40% pay raises, new labs and a healthy flow of research money from a Texas state bond fund. Another factor, unrelated to Rice, helped close the deal: The professors’ sense that declining state funding for the University of California makes it a good time to pack their bags. “What’s happening now is that the UC and most of the public schools are getting in a much weaker position to play this game,” said physicist Jose Onuchic, who has taught at UC San Diego for 22 years but will head to Texas next month, along with fellow physicist Herbert Levine and biochemist Peter Wolynes.last_img read more

first_imgAn exhaustive high-level review of unethical syphilis experiments conducted in Guatemala by U.S. researchers in the 1940s has found little to redeem the work or its lead researcher. The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues concluded that the study was shoddy scientifically and did not meet ethical standards at the time. The 1946-48 experiments, in which U.S. Public Health Service researcher John Cutler deliberately infected hundreds of Guatemalan soldiers, prisoners, and mental health patients with sexually transmitted diseases, were first revealed by a Wellesley College historian last October. They have been compared to the infamous Tuskegee, Alabama, study in which African Americans with syphilis were observed but not treated. Cutler, who died in 2003, was also involved in that study from 1932 to 1972. President Barack Obama asked his bioethics commission to investigate last fall. The commission’s staff members spent 9 months digging through and reviewing more than 125,000 archival documents. The commission conducted “a careful and unvarnished ethical analysis” of what happened, said chair Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania, at a meeting yesterday in Washington, D.C. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) The panel found a compelling context for the experiments: Sexually transmitted diseases were rampant among returning World War II veterans. Soldiers at risk were told to apply various prophylactic treatments, and Cutler wanted to find out if penicillin worked better. He and others took blood and other fluid samples, including spinal taps, from more than 5000 patients in Guatemala, without their consent. An overlapping group of more than 1300 patients were exposed to syphilis, gonorrhea, or chancroid by inoculation or contact with prostitutes. Fewer than 700 got some form of treatment. The Guatemala project violated ethical norms of the day, the panel found, after comparing it with a similar experiment performed by some of the same researchers at a federal prison in Indiana a few years earlier. There, prisoners were also exposed to gonorrhea, but only after they had volunteered and given informed consent. In addition, community standards were emerging: In 1947, The Journal of the American Medical Association published the Nuremberg Code requiring patients’ consent—a response to Nazi experiments. “We had enough ethics in the air and in society that would have instructed the Guatemala researchers to do differently than they did,” said commission member Anita Allen, a law professor at Penn. One shocking case cited by the panel was a psychiatric patient who appeared to be dying of syphilis. Cutler put gonorrhea-infected pus in her eyes, urethra, and rectum and reinfected her with syphilis. Days later her eyes were full of pus and her urethra was bleeding. She died after 6 months. “This kind of case cannot be waved away by even the most acute awareness of fluctuation in medical ethics standards of the time,” said commission member John Arras, an ethicist at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. The commission also found many problems with the study’s methodology, including haphazard note-taking and illogical timing of experiments. For example, serological studies, which were meant to determine baseline disease rates in the population, were conducted after the treatment studies had begun. Little was published. “It was bad science,” Nelson Michael of the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Silver Spring, Maryland, concluded. The commission blames this in part on Cutler’s inexperience but also held him and his supervisor, John Maloney, responsible for burying their reports. Although the Guatemala experiments would not happen under today’s rules, “we should be ever vigilant to ensure that such reprehensible exploitation of our fellow human beings is never repeated,” Gutmann said. The commission is following up with a second project: reviewing current standards for protecting research subjects in the United States and abroad. An international subcommittee appointed by the panel reported today that it has found several areas for improvement. They include a need to engage with local communities, ensure ethics training of researchers and ethics reviewers abroad, and setup a U.S. system for compensation for research-related injuries. The subcommittee also urged that all human studies involving some risk, not just drug trials, be registered in public databases. The emphasis is not on creating new rules but on “strengthening the protections that most people agree upon,” said commission subcommittee member Christine Grady, a bioethicist at the National Institutes of Health. The subcommittee’s findings will be published in the Federal Register for comment and fed into a final report to the president from the bioethics commission in December.last_img read more